Decorative Stuffed Embroidered Pears

Sep 15, 2020
by Rothney Chase

This month I will be sharing my tips for using metallic thread and then show how to construct a stuffed pear.  I love these pears and use them for decorating all year round but especially at Christmas time!  These pears are for my pink Christmas!

They are easy to create, and even when I slow my machine down to 350 stitches, I can complete a pear in an hour.

The first pear has the background stitched in silver metallic with pink candlewicking on top.  The second pear has the background stitched in pink with silver metallic candlewicking on top.  It makes quite a difference!  These pears stand about 4 inches high and 3 ½ inches wide.

Most of the pear is done in the hoop.  Only the third seam is stitched out of the hoop.



The first design for the pear has the pear outline, the seam guide for the opening, the background, and the candlewicking. I did not change the needle from embroidery to metalic at any time during the making of these pears!!  When it was time for the metalic thread, I ran a few beads of Sewer’s Aid up and down the spool of metallic thread.



One of the reasons why metalic thread breaks is because it twists when it comes off the spool if set up the way embroidery thread is normally set up.  If the spool is allowed to roll freely in a horizontal position, the thread does not twist.  For small projects, the picture below shows how I guide the metalic thread.  The spool is set on the horizontal spool holder with the thread coming off the spool from the bottom.  I then wrap the thread around my fingers so that my little finger gently pulls the thread off the spool, and my thumb against my second finger judges the tension.  The thread then goes through another guide that is just behind my hand before it is threaded through the machine.  I stitched all of the silver thread on all 3 sides for the 2 pears without having any problems.  No frustration!!


The first side of the pear is then unhooped and a ‘fussy cut’ is done around the pear outline.

The second side of the pear is then stitched on the machine.  The second design for the pear has the pear outline, the seam guide for the third seam, the background, and the candlewicking. 

The second side of the pear is then unhooped and a ‘fussy cut’ is done around the outline.

For the third design of the pear, only the first 3 color stops are stitched.  These color stops are for the outline, the background and the candlewicking. 

 

Now, the top and bobbin threads need to be changed to regular sewing thread. Then the second side of the pear is laid over the third side that is in the hoop, right sides together, matching the outlines and markings.  This is taped in place with a few pieces of masking tape.  I make sure to reduce the stitch speed on the machine.  Then the 4th color stop is stitched while I gently skim my fingers over the top.  I stitch right over the tape.  This is the first seam of the pear.



The first tapings are then removed and the second side of the pear is folded back over itself.  It is taped down out of the way.



Then the first side of the pear is laid over the third side that is still in the hoop, right sides together, matching the outlines and markings.  This is taped in place with a few pieces of masking tape. Then the 5th color stop is stitched while I gently skim my fingers over the top.  This is the second seam of the pear.

    


When all of the tape is removed, the design in the hoop should look like the picture below.



Pin this third seam, right sides together, matching the notches.  The arrows in the picture below show where 2 pins were placed to mark the opening that is on the underside.



Stitch from the top of the pear to the top of the opening area, following just inside the embroidered seam line as shown in the picture below.  Leave the marked area open.  Stitch from the bottom of the opening to the bottom of the pear.


I find that when a design is stitched in the hoop, it is very taut, but once the design is unhooped, the design may shrink a little.  When I went to stitch the third seam, I found that the seam guide that was embroidered, number 1 in the picture below, didn’t quite meet up with the seam that was stitched in the design, number 2 below, so when I went to stitch the third seam, number 3, I started stitching opposite the design stitched seam and then eventually stitched the rest of the seam inside the embroidered seam guide.  The first 5 or so dark pink stitches were then picked out.



All of the curves are clipped, the pear is turned inside out, and stuffed.  The opening is closed with a ladder stitch using the embroidered lines as a seam guide, which is shown in the picture below.



Leaves are cut out of ribbon and gathered by hand.  A doll needle is threaded with a piece of embroidery floss and inserted in the bottom of the pear and then brought up through the top of the pear.  The needle is then inserted in the top and brought out through the bottom, but before the thread is pulled tight, the leaves are placed in the loop on top that was made by the embroidery floss.  The threads are then pulled tight to form an indentation in the bottom of the pear.  The threads are then double knotted and clipped short.  This dent helps the pear sit upright.



I made some red on red, and gold on red pears for my red and gold Christmas!



And I made 10 purple pears to show off in my ‘tall wine glasses’ that I blogged about earlier!  I use these all year round.  And even though I made the pink pears for Christmas, I will be using them all year round too!


If you have any questions or comments, please don’t hesitate to contact me at info@designsbyrothney.com

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