Not Quite the Right Colour! Organza that is!

May 13, 2020
by Rothney Chase

How many times have you wanted to stitch out some 3D organza items for your project but you can’t find the right colour?   Because this has happened to me on numerous occasions, I will show you a few tips that I use.

The pictures below show an ombre fabric that I wanted to use for a project.    I wanted to bring out the steel blue in the fabric using organza 3D butterflies.  The bottom 1/3 of each of the photos shows 2 different organza combinations.  I found that the combination on the right matched the steel blue perfectly.  The combination on the left wasn’t quite ‘bright’ enough.  The photographs in this blog may appear out-of-focus but it is just the nature of the subject material.   



The organza combinations above are from the samples below.  Please note that these samples were photographed on a white background.  They will show differently when laid on the actual fabric, as seen in the photo above.  The sample below shows, from left to right, 3 layers of blue-grey organza, 2 layers of blue-grey organza, 1 layer of blue-grey organza, 1 layer of aqua organza, and 2 layers of aqua organza.  The perfect combination above was 3 layers of blue-grey over 1 layer of aqua.  Who would have guessed this!


 

Some times I can’t find the right colour green for my project.  I only had 2 samples of green organza but 2 layers of each, as shown below in the photo on the left, were not satisfactory.  The middle photo shows 2 layers light green with 1 layer dark green on top.  The right photo shows 2 layers light green with 1 layer dark green underneath.   The green created in the middle and right photos have a subtle difference because of the placement of the dark green layer.



The following photos show 1 layer dark green organza with 1 layer yellow organza.  The left photo shows the yellow on top. The right photo shows the yellow underneath.   The greens created in the centre of each photo have a subtle difference because of the placement of the yellow layer.


 

The next 2 photos show 2 layers light green organza with 1 layer navy organza.  The left photo shows the navy on top. The right photo shows the navy underneath.    The greens created in the centre of each photo show quite a difference  because of the placement of the navy layer as well as its dark colour.


 

Below, the photo on the left shows 1 layer dark green organza with 1 layer white organza on top.  The right photo shows 1 layer dark green organza with 2 layers white organza on top.  The greens created in the centre of each photo show a subtle difference  because of 1 layer versus 2 layers of white.

Now I have lots of greens to choose from, but I have a new dilemma, which one to choose!!


 

 The following example had to be photographed on a colored piece of paper because the samples are so pale.  I wanted a very pale pink for some Gerbera daisies but the lightest pink that I had was not suitable.  The sample on the left shows a single layer and a double layer of the pink organza.  I don’t really like to use just a single layer of organza but 2 layers would be too pink.  Not what I wanted!  The middle sample is a single layer of white organza.  The sample on the right is 2 layers of light pink fine tulle.  

I hooped a single layer of pink then 1 layer of white and then 2 layers of light pink tulle along with a layer of water-soluble stabilizer.  I not only use tulle for a subtle change in color but also to give the object some stability.


 

Below is the finished daisy.



The photo below shows the different combinations that can be achieved by using, a) 1 layer of pink, b) 2 layers of pink, c) 2 layers of pink and 1 layer of peach, d) 2 layers of pink and 2 layers of peach, e) 1 layer of pink and 2 layers of peach, f) 2 layers of peach, g) 1 layer of peach, h) 1 layer of light blue, i) 1 layer of light blue and 1 layer of purple, j) 1 layer of light blue and 2 layers of purple, k) 2 layers of purple, l) 1 layer of purple.

Wow!  You can achieve many more colours just by combining different colors!


 

Try combinations with dark colours.  Below, the combination on the left is 2 layers of bright red organza and 1 layer of dark burgundy organza.  The result is a brighter burgundy.  The combination on the right shows pale colours, 1 layer of mint green organza and 2 layers of light mauve organza.  This results in a bluish-mauve. 


 

Turquoise organza can be hard to find in different shades, but not with combinations!  Below, on the left, you can see different variations using only one shade of turquoise and one shade of aqua.

On the right, you can see a colour achieved by using 1 layer of light purple organza and 2 layers of reddish-purple fine tulle.

Have fun experimenting with your organza fabrics!!


 

To summarize, try the following combinations, or variations of them, to achieve the colour you are looking for:

-  1 layer each of 2 different colours, top to bottom and then bottom to top

- 2 layers, one is coloured and one white, top to bottom and then bottom to top

- 2 layers, one is coloured and one dark, top to bottom then bottom to top

- 3 or 4 layers of organza

- 1 layer of organza 1 layer of tulle

- 2 layers of organza 1 layer of tulle

- 1 layer of organza 2 layers of tulle

 

Please remember to view your combinations of organza over your project fabric!

 

STOP!  Don’t throw away those scraps of organza after burning out your projects!

These scraps can be clipped down to any size you desire.  I normally lay my outer hoop on the table and then place a layer of water-soluble stabilizer over it.  One layer of organza is positioned over the stabilizer.  The clippings are scattered over this layer of organza.  Another layer of organza is placed over the clippings.  The inner hoop is then put over everything making it ready to embroider. 

Below, the photo shows clippings of blue and light green organza sandwiched between 2 layers of a darker green organza, making quite pretty and unique leaves!

  

 

Use 3, 4, even 10 different colour clippings to create beautiful butterflies, flowers, leaves, etc.  If you want the clippings to be more prominent, sandwich them between a layer of organza with a layer of tulle on top.


For Halloween projects, use lime green, purple, orange and black organza clippings.

For Christmas projects, use red, green and gold organza clippings,

For spring projects, use pink, peach, light blue and light purple organza clippings,


As a side note, with organza, I like to use a single layer of an opaque stabilizer that looks like it has a very tiny waffle weave.  This stabilizer goes by many different names but just check to see if it appears similar to the picture below.


 

I hope that I have inspired you to make more 3D flowers, leaves, and butterflies using a bunch of different combinations of organza and/or tulle! 

Happy embroidering!

 

If you have any questions or comments, please don’t hesitate to contact me at info@designsbyrothney.com

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Comments

Very informative. Thank You.
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